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Roulette:How to Play

Roulette

Roulette – the hypnotic wheel of fortune – is a huge hit in casinos across the globe.

Numbers – 1 to 37 – circle the board and are coloured red or black. The player places bets, either picking a colour or a number (or alternatively they could pick a range of numbers in a selected area of the wheel) and once bets are placed the croupier spins the wheel in one direction, then rolls in the ball in the other.

The tension builds as the wheel slows, then the ball drops into a slot. The number the ball lands in, the colour of the slot and whether it’s odd or even, determines who wins and the payout changes depending on the probability of the result.

The numbers on the boards may seem to be in a random order, but they have a specific layout that’s the same across Europe. There are two kinds of wheel – a single or double zero wheel – and the layout of the numbers is determined by the kind of wheel.  A single zero layout is generally found in Europe and the double zero is most often found in American casinos.

The ‘layout’ – or board that the bets are played on – is a black and white grid and there are many options for betting on this layout. A player can place a ‘single’ – betting on one number – a ‘split’ – betting on two adjoining numbers –or a ‘street’ – the name for a row of numbers.

Other options are a ‘corner’ – this bet is placed by putting a chip or chips on the cross between four numbers – and a top line – the same placement for the top line on the layout.

Players can also place bets on a colour – picking white or black – but the payout for this bet is considerably less as the likelihood of winning is so much greater.

There are a number of more complex ways to place bets on a game of roulette – the game can become very in depth, and has a very rich history, originating in France, in the 17th century.

Since its origin in Europe there have been a number of adaptions and developments to the game and its popularity has never waned. The most notable differences that are still apparent are the differences in layout across the world; America has the double zero layout whereas Europe has the single zero, and in Monte Carlo the board often has a central wheel with two layout boards at either side, whereas most game boards have only one layout beside the wheel.